English 2 AP Language and Composition Weekly Archives

Week 1: August 31-September 4, 2015

August 31: Orientation: Introduction to the class, class expectations, book distribution, etc.

Turn in Topic/Idea Chart from Maus Part 1

September 1: Summer Reading Essay Prep and Discussion

September 2:  Summer Reading essay (in-class timed write)

 September 3: Introduction to Rhetoric

What is Rhetoric?

September 4:  Rhetoric Handout

 multiple perspectives

Homework: Study for Rhetorical Terms Summer Vocab test on Tuesday.

Flashcards will be collected before the test!

Week 2: September 7-11, 2015

September 7: Labor Day

September 8: Rhetorical Terms Vocab Test

Flashcards will be collected before the test!

September 9: Book Check Out

Rhetoric Handout

Obama Acceptance of the Nobel Prize

President Kennedy's Commencement Address at American University

13 minute mark

September 10: Discipline Assembly

Homework: Patrick Henry's Speech to the Virginia Convention

September 11: Civics and Rhetoric

Patrick Henry's Speech to the Virginia Convention

Week 3: September 14-18, 2015

September 14: Summer Essay Return

Rhetorical Analysis

Patrick Henry's Speech to the Virginia Convention

AP Rhetorical Devices (with examples)

Homework: Complete Part 1 of Fahrenheit 451 by Wednesday

Read: "Not By Math Alone"

September 15: Complete Group Passage analysis and short presentations

Patrick Henry's Speech to the Virginia Convention

Discuss The Classical Model

Complete Fahrenheit 451, Part 1

September 16: 451 Themes

Symbols: Salamander and the Phoenix

In your groups today, discuss as thoroughly as you are able the following questions. Please write the group response to each question in complete sentences. The group may want to choose one person to record the answers or take turns writing.

1. The second paragraph describes the burning of a house containing books. What image does this create for the reader? What might this symbolism foreshadow?

2. What is the significance of Montag seeing his reflection in Clarisse’s eyes?

3. What things do the McClellans do cause them to be classified as peculiar?

4. What final question does Clarisse ask Montag on the night of their first encounter? Why might this question be a catalyst to the plot?

5. Find two further similes Montag uses to describe Clarisse. Do the similes serve any purpose other than to characterize Clarisse?

6. Describe the bedroom Montag enters. Whom does the setting characterize?

7. Describe the new idea for the parlor walls about which Mildred is so excited.

8. What test of love does Clarisse give Montag, and how does he respond to it?

9. Describe Clarisse’s personality. What observations does Clarisse make about how Montag differs from other firemen?

Homework: Begin Reading Fahrenheit 451: Part 2

September 17: Complete 451 discussion

Find a hard copy of an article no older than two weeks. It cannot be a straight news story. It must be a current event with opposing viewpoints that are being discussed or argued.--due Friday

September 19: Common Place Assignment

Common Place Example

Week 4: September 21-25, 2015

September 21: Complete 451 Discussion

In your groups today, discuss as thoroughly as you are able the following questions. Please write the group response to each question in complete sentences. The group may want to choose one person to record the answers or take turns writing.

1. The second paragraph describes the burning of a house containing books. What image does this create for the reader? What might this symbolism foreshadow?

2. What is the significance of Montag seeing his reflection in Clarisse’s eyes?

3. What things do the McClellans do cause them to be classified as peculiar?

4. What final question does Clarisse ask Montag on the night of their first encounter? Why might this question be a catalyst to the plot?

5. Find two further similes Montag uses to describe Clarisse. Do the similes serve any purpose other than to characterize Clarisse?

6. Describe the bedroom Montag enters. Whom does the setting characterize?

7. Describe the new idea for the parlor walls about which Mildred is so excited.

8. What test of love does Clarisse give Montag, and how does he respond to it?

9. Describe Clarisse’s personality. What observations does Clarisse make about how Montag differs from other firemen?

Homework:  Reading Fahrenheit 451: Part 2 by next Monday

 Read: "Not By Math Alone"

September 22: Socratic Seminar

"Not By Math Alone"

September 23: Fall Recess

September 24: Tracing 451 themes and key passages:

Use the classical argument arrangement to build a case for a Part 1 passage of 30-40 lines being the key to thematic development in the novel.

September 25: MLK in Context

Read MLK: Letter From Birmingham Jail

Week 5: September 28- October 2, 2015

September 28:  MLK in Context

451 Argument

Read MLK: Letter From Birmingham Jail

September 29: Complete 451 Argument: Begin Presetation

September 30: MLK--Letter From Birmingham Jail Aanalysis

Group rhetorical analysis

October 1: Minimum Day

 Complete MLK Rhetorical Analysis

October 2: MLK Analysis

451 Quiz

Week 6:  October 5-9, 2015

October 5: Complete MLK questions

 

Letter From Birmingham Jail

Homework: Read 451 Part 3

 October 6: 451 Part 2

1. Why is Mildred worried about being caught with the books? What does this tell you of her character?

2.In Fahrenheit 451 the underdeveloped nations hate the United States, and war is a way of life so natural that it is scarcely noted. Predict what international relations and war will be like in the future.

3. What is the meaning of the title of Part Two? What is the importance of the dentifrice commercial? (What is being contrasted? Why? Does the commercial exemplify some aspect of the society?)

4. What does Faber tell Montag about books? What are the three things Faber says are missing from society? Tell how each is indeed missing from the society of Fahrenheit 451.

5.  How does Faber define the job of firemen? How does this differ from Beatty’s definition?

6. Explain Faber’s statement: "Montag, go home…Why waste your final hours racing about your cage denying you’re a squirrel."

7. Describe the device Faber provides for Montag to help him with Captain Beatty.

8. Describe the parlor women, their views, and their concerns.

9. Why does Montag take a book into the parlor?

10. "Dover Beach" is a literary allusion that is central to one of the book’s themes. Once the Sea of Faith has retreated, what is left?

11. What things in Fahrenheit 451 are representative of the lifeless waters that have replaced the Sea of Faith?

12. How do the women react after the reading of the poem? How does their reaction support Beatty’s explanation as to why literature of power had to be destroyed? [see pp. 61-65]

Dover Beach
by Matthew Arnold

The sea is calm to-night.
The tide is full, the moon lies fair
Upon the straits; -on the French coast the light
Gleams and is gone; the cliffs of England stand,
Glimmering and vast, out in the tranquil bay.
Come to the window, sweet is the night air!
Only, from the long line of spray
Where the sea meets the moon-blanch'd land,
Listen! you hear the grating roar
Of pebbles which the waves draw back, and fling,
At their return, up the high strand,
Begin, and cease, and then again begin,
With tremulous cadence slow, and bring
The eternal note of sadness in.
Sophocles long ago
Heard it on the Aegean, and it brought
Into his mind the turbid ebb and flow
Of human misery; we
Find also in the sound a thought,
Hearing it by this distant northern sea.
The Sea of Faith
Was once, too, at the full, and round earth's shore
Lay like the folds of a bright girdle furl'd.
But now I only hear
Its melancholy, long, withdrawing roar,
Retreating, to the breath
Of the night-wind, down the vast edges drear
And naked shingles of the world.
Ah, love, let us be true
To one another! for the world, which seems
To lie before us like a land of dreams,
So various, so beautiful, so new,
Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light,
Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain;
And we are here as on a darkling plain
Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,
Where ignorant armies clash by night.
[1867]

October 6: Complete 451 Part 2 Analysis

October 7: Vonnegut Precis

October 8: Promises, Promises

Week 7:  October 12-16, 2015

October 12: Happiness in 451

Homework: Read 451 Part 3

1. Why is Mildred worried about being caught with the books? What does this tell you of her character?

2.In Fahrenheit 451 the underdeveloped nations hate the United States, and war is a way of life so natural that it is scarcely noted. Predict what international relations and war will be like in the future.

3. What is the meaning of the title of Part Two? What is the importance of the dentifrice commercial? (What is being contrasted? Why? Does the commercial exemplify some aspect of the society?)

4. What does Faber tell Montag about books? What are the three things Faber says are missing from society? Tell how each is indeed missing from the society of Fahrenheit 451.

5.  How does Faber define the job of firemen? How does this differ from Beatty’s definition?

6. Explain Faber’s statement: "Montag, go home…Why waste your final hours racing about your cage denying you’re a squirrel."

7. Describe the device Faber provides for Montag to help him with Captain Beatty.

8. Describe the parlor women, their views, and their concerns.

9. Why does Montag take a book into the parlor?

10. "Dover Beach" is a literary allusion that is central to one of the book’s themes. Once the Sea of Faith has retreated, what is left?

11. What things in Fahrenheit 451 are representative of the lifeless waters that have replaced the Sea of Faith?

12. How do the women react after the reading of the poem? How does their reaction support Beatty’s explanation as to why literature of power had to be destroyed? [see pp. 61-65]

October 13: PSAT

October 14:  451 Part 2

October 15: 451 Part 3 Quiz

Part 2 Analysis

Organization in Rhetorical Analysis Essay

October 16: MLK in-class essay

Week 8:  October 10-23, 2015

October 19: Read and annotate Reading Books and The Country That Stopped Reading

Complete a rhetorical triangle after annotating

October 20: 451: Utopia or Dystopia?

October 21: "Promises, Promises" Ad analysis

October 22: 1. What did Granger mean by “Welcome back from the dead.”

2. What does Granger mean by his quote “You’re not important.  You’re not anything.”? 

3. Explain the last implications of the events in the last 4-5 pages.

 Discuss Themes and conflict in 451

October 23: Socratic Seminar

Week 9:  October 26-30, 2015

October 23: 1. What did Granger mean by “Welcome back from the dead.”

2. What does Granger mean by his quote “You’re not important.  You’re not anything.”? 

3. Explain the last implications of the events in the last 4-5 pages.

 Discuss Themes and conflict in 451

Homework:  Review Reading Books and The Country That Stopped Reading

October 27: Soctratic Seminar

October 28: 451 Final Test

October 29 MLK Paper Return: Writing the Rhetorical Analysis

October 30: Writing the Argument: Voice and Organization

Week 10:  November 2-6, 2015

November 2:  Teacher Inservice: No School

November 3: Adding Voice to argument: Telescopes, Pause, and Metaphor

Homework: Rewrite one paragraph from MLK essay following the directions given in class (due next Tuesday)

November 4: Writing the Rhetorical Argument

 November 5:  AP in-Class Essy

November 6:  Annotate Ascher's "The Box Man"

Week 11:  November 9-13, 2015

November 9:  Introduction to SOAPSTone

November 10: "The Box Man" Discussion

November 11: Veterans' Day School Holiday

November 12: Discuss  Ascher's "The Box Man"

 November 13: AP Reading Comprehension Pratice Test

Week 12:  November 16-20, 2015

November 16:  SOAPSTone on Didion's "Santa Ana"

November 17: Complete Analysis of Didion

November 18: Style Analysis

November 19: Gasland

November 20: Gaslandd

Week 14:  Nov. 30 - December 4, 2015

November 30:  How to Google

Research 6-7 valid articles on Fracking from 3 different perspectives

December 1: Combine in Groups of 4 to develop a commercial using the Classic Arrangement of Argument model from an assigned perspective

December 2: Create storyboards for comercials

December 3: Film Commercials

December 4: Complete filming and present commercials\

Week 15:   December 8-12, 2015

Decemvber 8:  Complete Fracking Synthesis and Group Evaluations

December 9: AP Synthesis and models

December 10: Synthesis Essay

December 11: Group evaluation of Synthesis

December 12: Read and annotate Wolf passage

Week 16:  December 15-19, 2015

 December 15: Death of a Moth Review

Begin Analysis of Dillard's "Weasels"

December 16: Moth Essay

December 17:Complete "Weasels" analysis

Essay Prep

December 18: In Class Essay

December 19: Essay Analysis: Selecting the Best of All Possible Essays.

Week 16:  December 15-19, 2015

 December 15:  Read and annotate Wolf passage

December 16: Synthesis Essay

December 17: Death of a Moth Review

Begin Analysis of Dillard's "Weasels"

December 18: Moth Essay

December 19: Minimum Day

AP Practice Test

Week 17:  January 4-8, 2016

 January 4: Synthesis Feedback and Rhetorical Analysis Review

January 5: Rhetorical Analysis Moth and Weasel's Review

January 6: Moth Rhetorical Analysis Essay

January 7: Dillard Weasels Analysis

January 8: Weasels Rhetorical Analysis Essay

Week 18:  January 11-15, 2016

 January 11: Essay Review and Evaluation

January 12: Rhetorical Analysis Model

Submit essay for evaluation

January 13: Information Society

January 14: AP Practice Exam

Janaury 15: Technology and Information Common Place Assignment

Week 19:  January 18-22, 2016

January 18: MLK Holiday

January 19: America's Dumbest Generation Review

1. Take one persepective and create arguments/counterargue with a group fwith a different perspective

January 20: Technology article analysis

Introduction to "The Internet's Own Boy"

Janaury 21: Documentary

Janaury 22: Documentary

Week 20: Janaury 25-29

January 25: Own Boy

Janaury 26: Rhetorical Analysis of Documentary

January 27: Final Exams

January 28: Final Exams

January 29: Final Exams

Week 1:  February 1-5, 2016

 February 1: Faculty In-Service

Febraury 2: Final Exam Review

SVUSD Required Writing Assessment (Synthesis)

Blending CD/Com, Topic Sentences, Thesis statements

+1 Commentary

Reading Skills

Febraury 3: SVUSD Required Writing Assessment (Synthesis)

February 4: SVUSD Required Writing Assessment (Synthesis)

Febraury 5: ISVUSD Writing Assessment

Week 3:  February 15-19, 2016

February 15: President's Day Holiday

February 16: Introduction to Satire

February 17: Propaganda Skit and Fallacy Review

February 18: AP Registration Info

Satire Review

Read and Annotate War Prayer

Febraury 19: Propoganda and Fallacy Test

Week 4:  February 22 - 26, 2016

 February 22: Finding Satire: "War Prayer" Discussion

February 23: Satire or Trolling?

Read and Annotate Twain's "Advice to Youth"

February 24: Your Turn: In Groups of 4, create your own satiric imitation of Twain's "Advice." Showcase hyperbole, irony, incongruity, etc. One paragraph per student.

February 25: Present "Advice" to class

Febraury 26: Dystopian Satire

Week 5:  February 29 - March 4, 2016

 February 29: AP MC Pratice Test

Read and annotate Twain's "Damned Human Race"

March 1: Analyze Satire in "Damned Human Race"

March 2: RA Essay

March 3: RA Models and Forced Rankings Response

March 4: Argument and Common Place

Week 5:  March 7 - 11, 2016

March 7: AP MC Review and Self-Analysis

March 8: Argument Review and Models

March 9: Building Arguments

March 10: In-Class Argument Essay

March 11: Common Place Assignment (op-ed on Presidential race)

Week 6:  March 14-18, 2016

March 14: Argument Essay: Humor

March 15: Norming--AP released Essay grading and discussion

March 16: Peer Audit

March 17: Peer Audit

March 18: Metaphor Mixers

Week 7:  March 21-25, 2016

March  21: CFA Mutilple Choice Test

March 22: Argument Essay

March 23: Norming and Peer Audit

March 24: Peer Audit

March 25: Style Revisions--Flow, metaphor and pause

Week 8:  April 4-8, 2016

April 4: Style Review: Flow Sentences, Metaphor, Pause

April 5: Argument Essay Choice and Submission

April 6: Argument Review--Read and Outline Argument prompt

Key elements of argument

April 7: Argument Essay

April 8: Counselor Visits

Week 9:  April 11-15, 2016

April 11: Argument Review/AP Models

April 12: Argumernt Peer Audit

April 13: Synthesis Review

April 14: Synthesis Essay

April 15: AP Practice Test

Week 10:  April 18-22, 2016

April 18: AP Practice Test Correctios and Reflection

April 19: Honor Code Alignment and Peer Audit

April 20: Complete Synthesis Peer Audit

Rhetorical Analysis Review

April 21: Rehtorical Analysis Essay

April 22: AP Practice Test

Week 11:  April 25-29, 2016

April  25: Rhetorical Analysis Review and Practice

April 26/27: AP MC Test "expert discussion groups

Group according to strengths/wekaness and discuss stratagies for answering MC questions

April 28/29: AP test Taking tips--Rhetorical analysis pratice (analyze and outline for two prompts.)

May 16: Complete the Movie Special

Introduction to Shakespeare

May 17: Elizabethan Language

Introduction to Shakespearian Language

Ure Fader (text)

Canterbury Tales Prologue

Renaissance Language

May 18: Read  Scenes 1-2 from Act 1 of Caesar

May 19:  Complete Reading Act 1 from Caesar

Group work: 

1. Find 2 puns, 2 metaphors, 2 similes, 3 images, and complete 2 scansions of sentences to check for iambic pentameter in Act 1 scenes 1-2 of Caesar

2. Who speaks in poetry? Who speaks in prose? Who speaks in blank verse? why?

3. Identify at least 5 characteristics found in the characters of Caesar, Brutus, and Cassius.

May 20: Historical Caesar

Week 15:  May 23-27, 2016

May 23: Complete discussion of Caesar Act 1.

 Complete character analysis on Brutus, Caesar, Antony, Casca, and Cassius:

1. Create a list of adjectives that describes the character traits of each character listed above.

Homework: Study for Act 1 quiz. 

Read the easy version of Julius Caesar Act 2

May 24:  Caesar Quiz Act 1 (Grade in class) 

Read Julius Caesar Act 2: Discuss images, the tripartite man, and conflicts  

May 25: Read Julius Caesar Act 2: Discuss images, the tripartite man, and conflicts  

 May 26:  Read JULIUS CAESAR Act III

May 27: Read JULIUS CAESAR Act III

 Close Reading Questions (pg 242, #6 a-d 6.)

"Our Course will seem to bloody , Caius Cassius" (Act II Scene 1, Line 162)

a. Brutus says, "Let's be sacrifices, but nor butchers, Caius." Collect together the expressions used by Brutus which are appropriate to butchery.

b. Brutus says that ideally they should be killing Caesar's spirit, not his body. Look up the words of Caesar's ghost in Act IV Scene 3, lines 281, 282, and 284, and comment on the irony.

c. Brutus turns harsh words and phrases into softer ones, to make a savage act seem like a civilized one. How does he choose his words to achieve this?

d. How is Brutus's dismissal of Antony consistent in expression with his earlier imagery?

In pairs of two, complete a Venn Diagram that compares and contrasts Brutus and Caesar, Portia and Calpurnia.

Underneath each comparison, write at least 4 sentences explaining the differences between the characters and speculate as to why Shakespeare portrays them in this manner.

May 30: Memorial Day

May 31: Watch Acts 2-3 of Julius Caesar

 June 1: Group work: Identify at least 5 rhetorical devices in the speeches of Brutus and Antony.  Explain how the lines of the speech you choose qualify as models for the rhetorical devices.

Close Reading Questions
8. “Romans, countrymen and lovers” (Act III Scene2, line13)

a. This is a speech based on reason (unlike Antony’s later, which is based on passion). Why does Brutus say the crowd should believe him?

b. How many words can you find that are antithetical (that is, in strong contrast), such as “less”/ “more”, “living”/ “dead”? What is the cumulative effect?

c. Many words and phrases are balanced: for example, “As Caesar loved me, I weep for him ; as he was fortunate, I rejoice at it; as he was valiant, I honour him”. Find more, and say why they are calculated to win over the crowd.

9. “Friends, Romans, Countrymen, lend me your ears” (Act III Scene 2, line 71)

a. Antony uses the word “honourable” to describe Brutus and Cassius eight times. Each time the way in which it is spoken is different, and with a different purpose. Carefully trace the transition from the first “For Brutus was an honourable man” to “They that have done this deed are honourable”, explaining how Antony’s oratory has led the crowd from one point of view to another.

b. In his second sentence, Antony says he is content to let Caesar’s good points be buried with his bones. How many good points does he in fact make before this 35-line speech is ended?

c. How does Antony deploy the words “ambition” and “ambitious” to win over the commoners to hid point of view?

June 2: Complete Group Work

June 3: Acts 2-3 Quiz

Begin Reading Act 4 of JULIUS CAESAR
Homework: Read modern language version of Julius Caesar, Act IV  

Week 17:  June 6-10, 2016

June 6: Act 4 of JULIUS CAESAR
Focus on character and images of court world/green world.
 Discuss Act 4

Homework: Read modern language version of Julius Caesar, Act IV  

 June 7:  Read Act 5 in class. 
During the readings, take notes on tragic elements in the play: hubris, anagnorisis, perepetia, hamartia, and catharsis.

June 8: Begin the following in groups of 4:
17. In his argument with Cassius in Act IV scene 3, Brutus refers to Caesar in terms of both praise and criticism. Find the speech and decide whether

a. the praise is consistent with earlier references to Caesar’s qualities and

b. whether the criticism is so major that Brutus should have mentioned it earlier.

10. The quarrel scene (Act IV Scene 2) has been belittled by the critic Thomas Rymer in the seventeenth century; praised by John Dryden, his contemporary, for its “masculinity” in the eighteenth century; admired as an example of dramatic genius in the nineteenth century (by Samuel Taylor Coleridge); and dismissed as irrelevant by twentieth century critic Henry Bradley. Read it carefully and decide for yourself

a. Whether Brutus is (i) unrealistic in expecting his allies always to act honorably or (ii) admirable in his inflexible attitude toward corruption.

b. Whether Brutus is (i) arrogant and insensitive towards Cassius at the beginning of the quarrel or (ii) properly firm and uncompromising.

c. Whether Brutus is (i) taunts Cassius or (ii) refuses to be browbeaten by him (Explain your answer)

d. Whether Brutus is (i) insultingly cold or (ii) admirable forthright

e. Whether Brutus is (i) sober form …”hides wrongs” or (ii) whether he is “armed so strong in honesty” that he cannot compromise.

Form an opinion of your own about the character of Brutus as it is revealed in the quarrel with Cassius from its beginning to its height.

10. The quarrel scene (Act IV Scene 3) shows Cassius in many moods.

a. choleric: what are the reasons for his anger, and are they justified?

b. tormented: how does Brutus provoke him , and what does Cassius’s restraint reveal about his personality?

c. passionate: does the passion throw a new light on his character?

d. affectionate: how does this show and is it surprising?

e. jocular: which episode brings out a flash of humor, and what is its purpose?

f. sympathetically emotional: would you have expected him to react to Portia’s death in the way he does? How does it compare with Brutus’s own response?

g. dependent: what evidence is there to show that in his relationship with Brutus, there is another side to Cassius than the one presented before the assassination?

After finishing the questions, identify the following parts of Julius Caesar. (Provide an explanation of each stage and where it occurs in the play. If you have problems remembering the terms, go to the top of the page and follow the Greek Tragedy link for definitions.)

Hamartia

Periptiea

Anagnorisis

Catharsis 

June 10: Caesar Acts 4-5 Quiz

June 13: Caesar Review and Character Analysis

    Julius Caesar Project
In groups of 3-4, select an important scene from Julius Caesar. Rewrite the scene into contemporary language. The scene should reveal specific characteristics of the play's characters. As you read and rewrite the scene into modern language, you should use your dialogue and voice to emphasize those characteristics (i.e. Brutus should be noble, Cassius should be duplicitous, etc.) You may turn the scene into a Western, a soap opera, a Dr. Seuss rhyme, an episode from your favorite TV show, etc.
Divide key roles and  create a dramatic reading of the scene. Search the web for sound fx, and include appropriate sound fx within your presentation.
After you complete the reading and recording, we will post the audio to a shared site.  You will write your own, one page analysis of why your group chose to reenact this scene and explain what Shakespeare reveals about the character you played in your presentation. In the commentary, you must move beyond the obvious plot situation, and analyze the key character's spiritual, psychological, social, etc. motivation. Discuss what new insights you have about the character's qualities after portraying him or her.
40 points