English 2 Weekly Archives

Week #1: September 7 - 9, 2011

September 7:  Orientation: Introduction to the class, class expectations, book distribution, etc.

Sept. 8: Diagnostic Test: Reading and Writing Strategies

             Introduction to Description: Writer's at Work--Colleen McElroy

Sept. 9: Notes on Descriptive Essays (you will need Power Point to open the notes)

  Warm-up: Journal W&G p. 62-Choose a time of year and describe how it looks and feels to you. Post the work on your "Journals" page.

Read "from Letters Home from Vietnam" on page 102 -103 of Writing and Grammar W&G),

Read W&G pages 14-17 and the top of page 108 (Create a Mood)

Create a graphic organizer labeled Taste, Sight, Touch, Smell, and Sound. Jot down descriptive details (in the correct category) that Loffler uses to set the scene for his family. (Example Below)

Descriptive Essay Prompt

Essay: Richard Loffler uses sensory details to convey a vivid impression of situations and events in Vietnam. Now it is your turn to write a description of an interesting situation or setting.

Directions: In this short essay you will describe an ideal or horrible place and then describe how that place makes you feel when you are there. Rather than writing about the entire setting, focus in on one small area of the setting you can describe well.

The paper should be typed and 250-450 words in length, MLA format. (75 points) 
Suggested Format:
Introduction: Three to four sentences setting up the theme/dominant impression of the essay.
Body #1: Physical description of the place. (i.e. the pounding of the water of Niagara Falls) 
Body #2: Description of how you feel when you are there. (i.e. how you feel like such an insignificant part of nature)
Conclusion: Three or four sentences combining body #1 and body #2 into one motif.

< size="5">Week #2: September 12 - 16, 2011

September 12: Book Pick-Up at library

Preview student descriptive essay model in WG p.116-117  (Please note the sensory details to describe the setting)

Groups of 3: Read and evaluate student models

Read Page 38 in W&G: complete exercise 11 at the bottom of the page

Homework:

 1. List 4 or 5 places you have been that bring back strong memories. For each location, pick a specific setting and write lists of details about how you remember that place. For example

Boston--> Plymouth Plantation

Hot and Humid --87 degrees

Small, musty houses--about 6 x 8 feet

Hard, dirt, caked floors

People wearing heavy layers of clothes, large red skirts, white cotton blouses, beige wool caps

etc. . . .

2. Now, for each location you have recalled, identify what type of dominant impression (mood) you would want to create if you were to write on this topic.

 

September 13:  In-class rough draft of their descriptive essay. The prompt is immediately below. Complete the rough draft this evening.

 Descriptive Essay Prompt

Essay: Richard Loffler uses sensory details to convey a vivid impression of situations and events in Vietnam. Now it is your turn to write a description of an interesting situation or setting.

Directions: In this short essay you will describe an ideal or horrible place and then describe how that place makes you feel when you are there. Rather than writing about the entire setting, focus in on one small area of the setting you can describe well.

The paper should be typed and 250-450 words in length, MLA format. (75 points) 
Suggested Format:
Introduction: Three to four sentences setting up the theme/dominant impression of the essay.
Body #1: Physical description of the place. (i.e. the pounding of the water of Niagara Falls) 
Body #2: Description of how you feel when you are there. (i.e. how you feel like such an insignificant part of nature)
Conclusion: Three or four sentences combining body #1 and body #2 into one motif.

September 14: How to write longer sentences: Introduction to flow techniques of Freighting and Telescoping.

In groups of 4, students will construct 2 freighting sentences. Groups will choose their best examples and show them to the class. (10 points)

Homework: Due Thursday--Complete two freighting sentences . (10 points)

The freighting sentences should be 5 lines long (number each line 1-5 so I do not have to count.)

September 15: Review Freighting

Introduction to Telescoping strategies and Flow sentences overview

 In groups of 4, students will create 4 sample telescoping sentences. They will then review both their telescoping  sentences, write "S" for every telescope that is a sentence and "N" for every telescope that is not a sentence. Groups will then correct any telescope that is not a correct sentence. 

After completion of the group exercise, each student will create one telescope sentence of their own. Both group work and individual telescopes will be collected at the end of class

Homework: Bring a completed copy of your rough draft with 2 freights and 2 telescopes on Friday.

September 16: Peer Response

Creating Metaphors

Introduction to Thesauroscoping, Soldering, Culturing, Line-ups, and Break-ups

Students will be placed in teams of three and will create metaphors using each method presented in class.  They will share and explain their metaphors with the class upon completion of the exercise.

Week 3: September 19-23, 2011

September 19: Complete rough draft in class

Introduction to Telescoping strategies and Flow sentences overview

 In groups of 4, students will create 4 sample telescoping sentences. They will then review both their telescoping  sentences, write "S" for every telescope that is a sentence and "N" for every telescope that is not a sentence. Groups will then correct any telescope that is not a correct sentence. 

After completion of the group exercise, each student will create one telescope sentence of their own. Both group work and individual telescopes will be collected at the end of class

Homework: Bring a completed copy of your rough draft with 2 freights and 2 telescopes on Tuesday.

Sept 20: Peer Response: You will need to have a rewritten copy of your descriptive paper in class today to earn points in a peer response activity. (20 points)

Creating Metaphors

Introduction to Thesauroscoping, Soldering, Culturing, Line-ups, and Break-ups

Students will be placed in teams of three and will create metaphors using each method presented in class.  They will share and explain their metaphors with the class upon completion of the exercise.

Homework: Revise rough draft using your peer response questions

September 21: Metaphors, Part Deux

 Add two freighting and two telescoping sentences, and 2 metaphors to the rough draft of your paper. These four sentences will add details to the description of your setting. Bring in a rewritten or typed copy of your paper tomorrow.

Homework: Revise your essays for spatial organization (Top to bottom, right to left, near to far, etc.) Bring in your draft on Friday to have your organization checked.

September 22: Principles of Revision/ Sample Essays

Introduction to Subject/Verb Agreement; view a Subject Verb Agreement Power Point Presentation

                                      Complete Exc. 1: 1-5 page 406

                                      Complete Exc. 2 : 1-5 p. 407 and Exc. 4: 6-10 page 409

                                      Complete Exc. 5: 1-5, page 410

                                      Complete Exc. 6: 1-5 page 572 and Exc. 7: 6-10 page 413

Homework: Revise Descriptive Essays. Final Draft due on Friday

September 23: Descriptive paper due.  Group read and response.

You will complete 3-5 minute quick writes for each of the following questions and attach it to the end of your final draft:

1. I believe this is the best paper I've ever written because . . .

2. I don't think this paper is very good because . . .

3. The instructor's reaction to my paper will be . . .

4. List the things you  learned about writing a descriptive essay from this paper

5.  What did you learn from this paper that I can't see? (i.e. what did you leave out, etc.)

Introduction to Elements of Plot

Read Prentice Hall Literature (PHL) pages 4-5

Week 4: September 26-30, 2011

September 26:

Introduction to Elements of Plot

Read Prentice Hall Literature (PHL) pages 4-5

Take notes defining the following terms from your reading on pages 4-5 of
PHL (Part 1: Making and Revising Predictions.)


Character, main character (protagonist), minor character, dynamic character, and static character

Setting, Plot, Exposition, Inciting Incident, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, Denouement (Resolution)

Theme

Introduction to "The Monkey's Paw"

Homework: Register for the text on Success.net

September 27:Read The Monkey's Paw

Pearson Text Version of "The Monkey's Paw"

October 28: Take self test on Monkey's Paw (enter the web code eqa-6103 and take the self test--show your results to the teacher as soon as you complete the test, if you are absent)

Group Work : In groups of 3, identify the exposition, inciting incident, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution in "The Monkey's Paw."

Definitions for plot and its elements (for those who did not finish the in-class assignment)

1. Use the link to view "The Monkey's Paw"

2. Summarize the exposition of the story under the heading "Exposition," the Inciting Incident under the
heading, "Inciting Incident," the Rising Action of the story under the heading "Rising Action," etc, until you have
broken the story down into the elements of plot listed above. You must also identify the precise areas of each plot section by writing the first and last sentence of each section in the story

Ex:

Inciting Incident

Text from the story that contains the inciting incident:

"There he is," said Herbert White, as the gate banged to loudly and heavy footsteps came toward the door. . .

  "Sergeant-Major Morris," he said, introducing him.



3. When you have completed breaking the story into the basic elements of plot, write one sentence (in a different
font and color) that explains how the story part you have chosen fits the specific definition of the plot element
(exposition, inciting incident, rising action, etc.)
 

Commentary that explains why the text you have pasted into your page is the inciting incident:

When Herbert White opens the door, he commits the act that sets the story in motion. The simple act of opening the door will lead to the acquisition of the monkey's paw, the tragic wishes, and eventually the destruction of his family.


4. Draw a picture representing the key moment in the story for each element of plot.
 

 Homework: "The Monkey's Paw"

September 29: Fall Recess

September 30: Complete "The Monkey's Paw" plot assignment

Discuss plot, character, irony, symbol, and theme in "The Monkey's Paw"

Week 5:  October 3 - 7, 2011

October 3: Take self test on Monkey's Paw (enter the web code eqa-6103 and take the self test--show your results to the teacher as soon as you complete the test, if you are absent)

Return Descriptive Essays

Instructions for completing essay corrections:

1. Take out a clean sheet of paper and a pen.

2. Read through your essay and the comments.

3. On your essay, number any error that has been marked, and any comment that asks for more details, discussion or flow. (Begin with 1 and continue numbering for each mark or comment made on your paper.)

3. On the clean sheet of paper, begin making the corrections or adding additional sentences. Make certain that the numbered corrections match the numbers you placed next to your errors.

4. For any sentence that has a grammatical error, rewrite the sentence and add the correct punctuation, change the spelling, etc.

5. For any sentence or portion of the paper where more details, freights, telescopes, etc.  are needed,  add the new sentences on the clean sheet of paper without rewriting the paragraph it came from.

Follow the links in your comments and read the web pages that will help you improve your grammar skills. Complete and print one interactive test at the "Guide to Grammar and Writing" web site.

If the mistake in your essay is:

The lake (1) were (VT) beautiful.  The sun was shining (2). (add details)

The essay correction sheet will read:

1. The lake is beautiful.

2. The sun's orange, purple, and red rays created a rainbow of reflections off the water's surface

 Discuss plot, character, irony, symbol, and theme in "The Monkey's Paw"

October 4:

Journal: How is fate like a donut?

Recreate a scene from "The Monkey's Paw"

1. Each group member will need to voice a role, whether it be the narrator or a character.

3. Select one area of the plot from which you will pull your scene. Make certain you are analyzing and interpreting what the tone or mood of the story should be at that moment of the plot. (exposition, inciting incident, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution)

Prepare a script and quietly practice your role play.we will begin tomorrow)

October 5: Late Start Day

Complete Role Plays

Read Poe's "The Masque of Red Death"

October 6: Complete "The Masque of Red Death"

Problems with Poe's vocabulary? Click Here

For information on the plague, check the following sites Bubonic Plague and for a first hand account, go to I Saw the Death

October 7: Journal: How is a clock like the bubonic plague?

 Introduction to symbols in "The Masque of Red Death"

In groups, you will discuss the symbolism of the Seven Rooms in "The Masque of the Red Death"

Week 6:  October 10 - 14, 2011

 

October 10:  Classical Roots Vocabulary, Level B Lesson 1

Sample Word Map (This one's free!)

1. Place the vocabulary word inside a circle. Write the Greek or Latin root along with the root's meaning in each circle.

2. At the bottom of the circle, list one synonym and one antonym for the word.

3. On the right side of the circle, write the definition of the word.

4. At the top of the circle, create an original sentence that demonstrates your understanding of the word.

Complete and discuss the Symbolism of the rooms in "Masque of the Red Death"

Homework: Word Maps due Friday

October 11: Analyze the following elements in "The Masque of Red Death"

Characterization, Symbols, Irony--Here are some model answers to get you started

Groups of 4 will answer the following prompts to analyze the story:

1. Find the following symbols and list three details from the story about each: Prospero, the clock, east and west, the abbey, and room colors. State the meaning for each symbol.

2. Identify irony in the following details:

a. Prospero locks himself and his friends in an abbey.

b. the narrator's description of Prospero as "happy, dauntless, and sagacious." Use a dictionary for help.

c. Prospero's name and what happens to him at the end of the story.

3. Characterization: create a list of adjectives to describe:

a Prospero

b. Prospero's friends

Homework: Word Maps due Friday

October 12: Complete Tuesday's group analysis

Final discussion on "The Masque of Red Death"

Literary Terms: Plot, Exposition, Inciting Incident, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, Resolution, Characterization, Irony, Setting, Foreshadowing

Homework: Study for an open note test on "The Monkey's Paw" and "The Masque of Red Death." The test will be multiple choice and focus on reading comprehension, literary analysis, and identification of literary terms. The reading comprehension and literary term sections will require you to read a selection from the story and answer specific questions about that selection. (Just like the CAHSEE and CST exams).

October 13: Minimum Day

Monkey's Paw and Masque of Red Death Test.

Homework: Complete word maps and study for CRB #1 test

October 14: CRB #1 test; word maps due

Journal #4: Is there a standard for beauty that all humans can agree upon?

Twilight Zone Special: "In the Eye of the Beholder"

Week 7:  October 17 - 21, 2011

October 17:  Classical Roots Vocabulary, Level B Lesson 2

Sample Word Map 1. Place the vocabulary word inside a circle. Write the Greek or Latin root along with the root's meaning in each circle.

2. At the bottom of the circle, list one synonym and one antonym for the word.

3. On the right side of the circle, write the definition of the word.

4. At the top of the circle, create an original sentence that demonstrates your understanding of the word.

Journal #4: Is there a standard for beauty that all humans can agree upon?

Twilight Zone Special: "In the Eye of the Beholder"

Homework: Word Maps due Friday

October 18: Discuss Blind SpotsOptical Ilusions, and truth/perception. View Dali's Hallucinogenic Torreador

Introduction to Irony and Point of View, begin reading Saki's "The Open Window"

October 19: Complete Saki's "The Open Window"

Journal #5: How is a window like an opportunity? 10 minutes

Plot Analysis: (This is the same assignment you did in groups with "The Monkey's Paw," but you do not need to draw pictures.

1. Break each portion of the story into plot parts. Under the heading "Exposition," write the first and last sentence of the exposition using an ellipse to replace the missing information, identify the Inciting Incident under the heading "Inciting Incident," the Rising Action of the story under the heading "Rising Action," etc. until you have broken the story down into the elements of plot.

2. When you have completed breaking the story into the basic elements of plot, write one sentence in a different color that explains how the plot element you have chosen reflects or represents that specific plot element (exposition, inciting incident, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution.)

 Homework: Word Maps due Friday

October 20

"The Open Window" Irony Workshop: Groups of 3

1. Look up the meaning of the name Vera. How might Saki's choice of the name be considered verbal irony?

In what ways is the story's last line ironic?

3. Find two other ironic statements in the story.

4. What is the point of view in the sotry? How does the point of view create irony?

5. Identify important character traits of Framton Nuttel and Vera. What ation and dialogue are the most important in developing their characters?

Homework: Word Maps due Friday

Point of View Workshop

 

Homework: Complete word maps and study for CRB #2 test

October 21: CRB #2 test; word maps due

X-Files Special

Point of View Paragraph: Write two descriptive paragraphs on the same event, but told from two different points of view. The details you use should change with the speaker. Telescope, Freight, and use metaphors to build voice. Each paragraph should be 5-6 sentences.

Ex: A hockey player's description of what he sees, hears, and does when he scores a goal (1st person) vs. a fans view of the play from the stands (3rd person.)

Week 8:  October 24 - 28, 2011

October 24:  Classical Roots Vocabulary, Level B Lesson 3

Sample Word Map

Point of View Paragraph: Write two descriptive paragraphs on the same event, but told from two different points of view. The details you use should change with the speaker. Telescope, Freight, and use metaphors to build voice. Each paragraph should be 5-6 sentences.

Ex: A hockey player's description of what he sees, hears, and does when he scores a goal (1st person) vs. a fans view of the play from the stands (3rd person.)

Journal #5: If you had a time machine, what places or people would you choose to visit? Why?

Homework: CRB 3 Word Maps

October 25: Read "A Sound of Thunder"

Discuss Figurative Language and Theme in "A Sound of Thunder"

Group Work: Complete an Annotated Timeline of the plot in "A Sound of Thunder"

An annotated timeline is a staight line that traces the years abd events in a story. List the events in "A Sound of Thunder under the date or year in which they occur.

Homework: Read the Expository Essay Introductory Paragraph presentation

October 26: Journal: Explain the similarities and differences between "A Sound of Thunder" and The Simpson's "Time and Punishment" vignette.

Introductory Paragraphs in Expository Writing

Develop an introductory paragraph for the following prompt:

Bradbury's short story offers a strong theme regarding human interference with the future. Write an introductory paragraph that examines how Bradbury's characters use the time machine responsibly or irresponsibly.

Hook

Statement of Situation

Theme

Thesis

Homework: Revise your introductory paragraph on "A Sound of Thunder and turn it in tomorrow--15 points

 CRB 3 word maps

October 27: Share Introductory Paragraphs

Number each sentence and identify the hook, statement of situation, theme, and thesis.

Does the thesis statement follow the thesis format? What is the writer's opinion?

Homework: Complete CRB 3 Word Maps

Study for CRB 3 Test

October 28: CRB 3 word maps due; CRB 3 test

Read "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge"

A YouTube version of the story

Week 9:  October 31 - November 4, 2011

October 31:  Classical Roots Vocabulary, Level B Lesson 4

Share Introductory Paragraphs

Number each sentence and identify the hook, statement of situation, theme, and thesis.

Does the thesis statement follow the thesis format? What is the writer's opinion?

Begin Reading  "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge"

Homework: Work CRB 4 Word Maps

A YouTube version of the story

 November 1: Complete "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge". Complete a Jigsaw on the following Questions

“An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge ” Questions
1. In Part 1, Bierce includes few details about the condemned man and does not reveal the reason why he is being hanged. How does this help create suspense?
2. In what ways are the condemned man’s perceptions of time and motion distorted as he is waiting to be hanged? Why are his distorted perceptions important?
3. What seems to be the narrator’s attitude toward Farquhar in Part II? What is the narrator’s attitude toward war?
4. Considering the outcome of the story, what is ironic or surprising about Farquhar’s longing for the “larger life of a soldier?” What is ironic about the fact that Farquhar agrees with the saying that “all is fair in love and war?”
5. What details in Part III suggests that Farquhar’s journey occurs in his mind? How is the journey connected with the plan of escape that occurs to him moments before he is hanged?
6. Explain whether you think the portrayal of Farquhar’s final thoughts and sensations is realistic.

7. Point of view refers to the vantage point from which the story is told. Why is the limited third-person point of view appropriate for this story? How might the story be different if Bierce had used an omniscient third-person narrator?
8. How does Bierce’s use of flashback contribute to the effectiveness of the story?

November 2: Late Start Day

Complete Jigsaw

Discuss elements in the story

Homework: Work CRB 4 Word Maps

November 3: Using your i-Touch, take an online quiz

 Homework: Complete CRB 4 Word Maps; study for test

November 4: CRB 4 Word maps due; CRB 4 test

View "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge"

Week 10:  November 7 - 11, 2011

November 7: Complete Jigsaw Questions from "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge". 

Write an introductory paragraph on the following question from "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge."
Examine whether Bierce's portrayal of Farquhar's final thoughts and sensations is or is not realistic.
Complete peer feedback on introductory paragraph, rewrite, and then turn in.

Homework: Study for test on "The Open Window," "The Sound of Thunder," and "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" Focus on plot structure, flashback, irony, characterization, symbols, and imagery, time and memory. You may use your notes and class work to help you during this test

 November 8:  Short Story Test

Read "Through the Tunnel"

November 9: Complete "Through the Tunnel"

Introduction to Rites of Initiation

Separation: The character leaves his/her normal, "ordinary" world behind. They feel some anxiety and fear as they leave.

Transformation: The character undergoes a series of physical or metal tests and trials. As a result of their experience, they learn something about themselves and mature.

Return: The character returns to his/her ordinary world with new knowledge and confidence. They are more mature and closer to adulthood.

Discuss "Through the Tunnel"

Homework: Preview Joseph Campbell's Journey of the Hero Archetype.

November 10: Multimedia presentation on Joseph's Campbell's "The Journey of the Hero Archetype"

Hero journey project.

Hero Journey Special: The Empire Strikes Back

Watch "The Empire Strikes Back" and complete the Hero Journey handout--identifying how events in the movie correspond with stages in the hero journey. The handout will be distributed in class; it will be due upon completion of the movie.

November 11: Veteran's Day Holiday

Week 11:  November 14 - 18, 2011

November 14:  Introduction to Hero journey project.

Hero Journey Special: The Empire Strikes Back

Watch "The Empire Strikes Back" and complete the Hero Journey handout--identifying how events in the movie correspond with stages in the hero journey. The handout will be distributed in class; it will be due upon completion of the movie.

Homework: Begin work on the Hero journey project

November 15: The Empire Strikes Back: Fill out hero journey worksheet and trace each stage of the hero journey in the film

Homework: Work on the Hero journey project

November 16: Late Start Day

Correct the Hero Journey graphic organizer

Review Symbolism and the Hero Jounrey in "Through the Tunnel"

Homework: Work on the Hero journey project

November 17: Read "By the Water's of Babylon," Take notes on the story as you read.  

Focus on Plot, Setting, Symbolism, Irony, Conflict, and Theme

Homework: Work on the Hero journey project

November 18: In pairs of two, create a graphic organizer for "By the Water's of Babylon," identifying the elements of the "Hero Journey" in the story.

Homework: Work on the Hero journey project

Week 12:  November 28-December 2, 2011

November 28:  In pairs of two, create a graphic organizer for "By the Water's of Babylon" and "Through the Tunnel" identifying the elements of the "Hero Journey" in the story.

 Homework: Work on the Hero journey project

November 29: Hero Journey Test Review: Complete the worksheet as preparation for tomorrow's test.

Homework: Study for the Hero Journey Test

Early turn in due date for The Hero's Journey Project tomorrow

November 30: Late Start Day

Hero Journey Test

December 1: Introduction to Narrative Writing

Wonder Years and Narrative Voice

Read Writing and Grammar: p 32-34, 36-39

Homework: Complete the Hero journey project

December 2: Hero's Journey Project Due

Review Narrative Essay Models Writing  Grammar exercises:

pp. 343-347

p. 344 Exc. 10: 6-10

p. 345 Exc. 11: 6-10 p.

346. Exc. 12: 6-10

Homework: Prepare for Narrative Essay rough draft:


1. Identify the lesson you learned from your hero journey
2. Identify the event that leads directly to the lesson you learned from your journey.
3. Identify the event that paved the way for you to experience what happened in your reflection from #2.
4. Identify the event that paved the way for you to experience what happened in your reflection from #3.

Bring the brainstorm in to class for the rough draft on Monday

Week 13:  December 5 - 9, 2011

December 5:  In class draft of Narrative Essay: Personal Hero Journey.

Narrative Essay Rubric

December 6:  Run-Ons and Sentence Fragments

Writing and Grammar exercises: pp. 343-347

p. 344 Exc. 10: 6-10

p. 345 Exc. 11: 6-10

p. 346. Exc. 12: 6-10

Read W&G: 354-362

Check drafts for run-on's and sentence fragments

Homework: Revise rough draft of narrative essay.

Bring in completed rough draft for peer response (20 pts)

December 7: Bring completed rough draft of narrative paper
Peer Response for Narrative paper

Review paper and revise for detail and dialogue. Keep track of all editing.

Review the Narrative Rubric: this will be the basis for your grade.

December 8: Review W&G 40-47.

Read Introduction to King Arthur

Fill out information on Complete Arthur Review Homework:

Homework: Complete final draft of essay. Essay is due Friday. Add two freight sentences and two telescope sentences.

December 9: Turn in Narrative Essay

Read "The Crowning of Arthur" in PHL 1154
On Line Version: (Book 1 Chapters 1-8).
Group Work: Complete Questions 2, 4, 6, 7 page 1092.

Week 14:  December 12 - 16, 2011

December 12: Read "The Marriage of Arthur" (Handout.)

Online version: Read Book 3 Chapter I, Chapter II, and Chapter XV.

Group Work: In groups of three, complete questions on symbols and chivalry.

What else occurs on the day Arthur weds Guenevere?
To what does King Arthur swear his knights?

Explain the significance of Leodegrance's gift to Arthur.

The King Arthur legends tell of a time in the early history of England when a belief in magic was supplanted by a belief in Christianity. What elements do you find of both magic and religion in this legend?

 Understanding Chivalry:
In your own words, summarize the code of conduct that Arthur established for his knights.
How does Merlin's response to King Arthur about marrying Guenevere fit in with the idea of chivalry?
Is chivalry alive in the modern world? Use examples to support your answer.

Homework: Complete final draft of essay; you must print the essay before class and staple the final draft to the top of your rough draft and peer response. The rough draft should be a printout of the changes you have made to the essay since your rough draft. Read final draft of essay for spelling and grammar corrections.

December 13: Turn in Narrative Essay

Notes on the Principles of Knighthood
Read "The Adventures of Sir Launcelot"
On-line version in Book 6 chapters i-ix.
Discuss the elements of the heroic tradition.

December 14: Watch brief A&E video on Knights and battle gear.
Identify 10 facts about knights and battles

Read "Le Morte de Arthur"  in PHL

Homework: Complete Le Morte de Arthur"  in PHL

December 15: Complete Arthur Review and prepare for Arthur Test
Create Themes for each of the following themes listed at the top of the King Arthur notes

Homework: Study for the Arthur Test

December 16: Arthur Test

Week 15:  January 2-6, 2012

January 2: School Holiday

January 3:Introduction to The Old Man and the Sea

An explanation of the Hemingway Code Hero (scroll down the page to locate the definition).

A more thorough discussion may be found here. Timeless Hemingway may be useful (The A room) if you have Hemingway queries.  

Check out copies of The Old Man and the Sea. Read silently.  

Homework: Read The Old Man and the Sea pages 1-30 Make corrections on narrative essay and turn in a printed copy with changes on Friday.

Preview the  Expository Writing Power Point

January 4:  Introduction to Expository Writing
Introduction to CAHSEE (California High School Exit Examination) Responses to Literature Rubric

Below is our goal when writing about literature. If you plan on graduating from high school in the state of California, you will need to write an essay that will do the following. If you follow the basic structure outlined in the power point presentation, you will be able to meet this requirement. Take careful notes and ask questions if you are confused.

California High School Exit Examination: Responses to literature--Standard 2.2

The main goal of responding to literature is to demonstrate a thoughtful comprehension of a literary passage or an expository text. The writer skillfully expresses an idea about a text and supports it with textual evidence. Connections are made between the main idea of the text, the writer's viewpoint, and the author's style. The most successful responses to literature or text are supported with textual references (concrete details) and clearly addresses the ambiguities, nuances, and complexities within the text. These responses illustrate a clear, comprehensive grasp of the main idea of the text and extent beyond what is present in the text with original ideas and connections.

Silent reading of The Old Man and the Sea

Homework: Read The Old Man and the Sea pages 31-65
Make corrections on narrative essay and turn in a printed copy with changes on Friday.

January 5: Discuss the theme of isolation in The Old Man and the Sea.

Complete Handouts 1, 3, 4 in class and discuss in large group.

Read "Hiking Trip" and sample "responding to literature" essays. They begin on page 103.

Homework: Complete reading of "Hiking Trip" and sample essays

Make corrections on narrative essay and turn in a printed copy with changes on Friday.

January 6: In-class essay.

I will select a passage from The Old Man and the Sea and you will answer the following question in a 45 minute essay:

In this passage from The Old Man and the Sea, the reader learns about the protagonist, Santiago. Santiago's personality and emotions are revealed through the actions and dialogue presented in the story.

Write an essay in which you describe the personality and emotions of Santiago. How do his personal characteristics add to the events in the story? How does the author reveal this information about Santiago in the story? Use details and examples from the story to support your ideas.

CAHSEE (California High School Exit Examination) Responses to Literature Rubric

Homework: Read pages 65-91 in The Old Man and the Sea

Week 16:  January 9 - 13, 2012

January 9: Complete Handouts 7 (Isolation)

Begin "Where Have You Gone Joe DiMaggio?"

Homework: Read The Old Man and the Sea pages 31-65

January 10: "Where Have You Gone Joe DiMaggio?"

Complete Handout 9 (Hero or Macho Man)

Homework: Read pages 65-91 in The Old Man and the Sea

January 11: Late Start

CASHEE Literary Response Essay Review

Complete handout 10: "The Man and the Sea."

Homework: Complete reading of Old Man and the Sea

January 12: Interpretive Question Discussion

Discuss theme of Defeat in The Old Man and the Sea.

 Complete handouts 13 and 14; discuss answers as a class.

 Homework: Complete any part of the worksheet you did not finish in class.

January 13: In groups of 4 complete the "Motifs" handout #16.

Week 17:  January 16 - 20, 2012

January 16: MLK Holiday

January 17: In groups of 4 complete the "Motifs" handout #16.

January 18: Jigsaw: Groups will assigned a topic: "Santiago as Everyman," "All Creatures Great and Small" and "By his Hands You Shall Know Him." Each group will answer the questions and report back to the class on their findings. Students should take notes on the discussion.

January 19:  Gallery Walk Prep

In groups of 4, each group will identify a symbol from the novel, explain its meaning, and consider how it develops a specific theme

1. Identify 1-3 symbols in The Old Man and the Sea
2. Review scenes and analyze the symbols you have chosen. Write down the concrete details in notes.
3. Based on the evidence, create a sentence that explains Hemmingway's message or idea on the topic
4. On the paper provided, identify the symbol and explain its meaning. write concrete details from the novel that develop the symbol, and explain how the symbol reinforces a specific theme.
5. Create a final illustration of either a specific scene where the symbol is used in the novel.

Symbols:
lions                dreams                 sleep
Sharks             the marlin             Santiago
Manolin            autumn                Joe DiMaggio          
night                fisherman             salao      
the marlin's skeleton            battle with the marlin     
The sea (distinguish between el mar or la mar)

January 20: Complete Gallery Walk Symbols Display

Final exam study prep: Old Man and the Sea, elements of chivalry, run-ons, comma splices, plot, imagery, symbols, metaphors, and reading strategies.
Review five paragraph expository essay format

Week 18:  January 23 - 27, 2012

January 23:  Gallery Walk Prep

In groups of 4, each group will identify a symbol from the novel, explain its meaning, and consider how it develops a specific theme

1. Identify 1-3 symbols in The Old Man and the Sea
2. Review scenes and analyze the symbols you have chosen. Write down the concrete details in notes.
3. Based on the evidence, create a sentence that explains Hemmingway's message or idea on the topic
4. On the paper provided, identify the symbol and explain its meaning. write concrete details from the novel that develop the symbol, and explain how the symbol reinforces a specific theme.
5. Create a final illustration of either a specific scene where the symbol is used in the novel.

Symbols:
lions                dreams                 sleep
Sharks             the marlin             Santiago
Manolin            autumn                Joe DiMaggio          
night                fisherman             salao      
the marlin's skeleton            battle with the marlin     
The sea (distinguish between el mar or la mar)

January 24:  Gallery Walk

Final exam study prep: Final exam study prep: Old Man and the Sea, run-ons, comma splices,  plot, imagery, symbols, metaphors, and reading strategies.  

Review five paragraph expository essay format

Identify the following from The Old Man and the Sea:

Santiago        Marlin            Manolin             Martin

Pedrico          Terrace         DiMaggio          Salao       

Agua Mala          Sargasso Weed                Cienfuegos 

Champion           Casablanca                       Harpoon (lance)

Essay Prep: Identify 3 symbols in The Old Man and the Sea Find two pieces of concrete detail (quotations) from the novel that show the symbols in action. You will need to develop three sentences of commentary per quotation that explicates how the quotation supports your thesis statement. If you notice a change in how the symbol is used or another literary device used with the symbol (allusion, imagery, metaphor, simile, conflict, plot, alliteration, active verbs, etc.) make certain to comment on it.

Week 1:  January 30 - February 3, 2012

January 30:   Capitalization Pretest

Introduction to Capitalization Rules

Complete the following exercises in Writing and Grammar text (answers only):

p 460: 1-5 (Exc. 1)

p. 461: 1-5 (Exc. 3) 

p. 464: 1-5 (Exc. 4)

p. 465: 1-5 (Exc. 6)

p. 467: 1-5 (Exc. 7)

p. 468: 1-5 (Exc. 8)

January 31: Pretest on apostrophes and quotation marks

Complete the following exercises in Writing and Grammar: (answers only)

p. 538:  Exc. 61, 62, 63 (all questions)

p. 540: Exc. 64  (1-10)

p. 542: Exc. 65 (1-10)

p. 543: Exc. 66 (1-10)

Febraury 1: Review Quotation Marks and Underlining: 504-518 Complete the following:

p. 506: Exc. 34 (6-10)

p. 507: Exc. 35 (6-10)

p. 509: Exc. 36 (6-10)

p. 510 Exc. 37 (6-10)

p. 516: Exc. 39 (6-10)

p. 518: Exc. 41 (6-10)

February 2: Capitalization and Possessives test

Watch video on Ancient Greece: Complete in-class handouts

February 3: Complete Ancient Greece video--Complete in-class handouts

Review of Capitalization and Apostrophes.

Journal: What do you understand about capitalization and apostrophe use?

What don't you understand about capitalization and apostrophe use?

Week 2:  February 6 - February 10, 2012

February 6:   Complete Ancient Greece video--Complete in-class handouts

Review of Capitalization and Apostrophes.

Journal: What do you understand about capitalization and apostrophe use?

What don't you understand about capitalization and apostrophe use?

February 7: Begin work on Greek Drama Group presentations.

In groups of 3, students will create a group presentation on an assigned topic from Greek Drama. Presentations will begin on Friday.

Homework: Research for Greek Theater Presentation

February 8: Research and Development of Greek Drama Oral Presentations

Homework: Complete research and development on Greek Drama Presentations

February 9: Research and Development of Greek Drama Oral Presentations
Introduction to Tragedy

February 10: Begin Presentations

Week 3:  February 13 - February 17, 2012

February 13: Begin Greek Drama Presentations

February 14: Complete Greek Drama Presentations

Journal: What do you understand about capitalization use?

What don't you understand about capitalization use?

February 15: Introduction to Tragedy

Introduction to Kohlberg's levels of moral development

Homework: Find a current article in a magazine or newspaper, or find historical research on the web that describes a person who has stood up for a moral belief.

February 16: Journal Write

Read and discuss the Prologue/Parados of Antigone; take notes and discuss conflict and exposition.

 Homework: Preview Antigone Parados

Febraury 17: President's Day Holiday

Week 4:  February 20 - 24, 2012

February 20: School Holiday

February 21: Introduction to Kohlberg's levels of moral development

Homework: Find a current article in a magazine or newspaper, or find historical research on the web that describes a person who has stood up for a moral belief.

February 22: Journal Write

Read and discuss the Prologue/Parados of Antigone; take notes and discuss conflict and exposition.

 Homework: Preview Antigone Parados

Febraury 23: Read Antigone scenes 1-2

Discuss Dramatic Irony, Characterization, and Tone

 Complete reflective journals on scenes 1-2 (find quotations in class and provide response for homework.) Identify and explore the meaning of three important quotations. If you complete the assignment in class, there is no other homework.

Reflective Journal Chart:

Quote from the play and page number:

What I think: Describe what the quote makes you think. Do not merely repeat what the quote is saying--draw connections to other school subjects, current news, movies, or experiences.

What this says about the book: State what this quote suggests about a character, the plot, etc. Point out how or why the author includes this line in the play, and what types of metaphors, images, allusions, or symbols may be at work. Point out what role the quotation may have in developing a conflict or theme.

What this says about the world: Explain what connection you see between the quotation and how people act or the world or society operates. Be specific and use examples. 

Febraury 24: Read Antigone, Scenes 3-4

Homework: Complete Reflective Journals for scenes 3-4. You are required to find a total of three different important quotations from these scenes.

Sample Reflective Journal

Week 5:  February 27 - March 2, 2012

February 27:  Reflective Journal Chart due for scenes 1-2

Read Antigone scenes 3-4

In groups of 3, complete questions on characterization, diction, and imagery

February 28: Complete Antigone

Answer analytical questions in PH Literature book and discuss irony

Homework: Complete three Reflective Journals for       Scenes 3-5

February 29: Journal: What is the difference between free will and fate? Is man's existence determined by fate, or does he have free will? Explain.

Group work: In groups of three, complete Tragic Hero worksheet and Irony Worksheet.

March 1: In groups of 3, complete the Antigone Review

Correct the Antigone Review

Homework: Study for the Antigone test

March 2: Antigone Test

Preview of CAHSEE Test

Week 6:  March 5 - 9, 2012

March 5:  Complete exercises from pages 93-95 in Language section of the CAHSEE

Grade practice tests

Complete Reflective Journal Chart  for scenes 3-5

March 6: Complete CAHSEE book excercises

Preview CAHSEE Essays

March 7: Take comma and Reading for Main ideas tests at

http://www.testprepreview.com/cahsee_practice.htm

March 8: Complete CAHSEE bookelts.  Use touches to take these tests on the following site:

http://www.testprepreview.com/cahsee_practice.htm

Commas Basic, Intermediate, and Advanced Grammar Reading for Main Ideas Advanced Reading Comprehension Sentence Correction and Sentence Correction 2

For each test, write the number of questions your answered correctly. For any test with more than 3 incorrect answers, follow the site links to practice modules for help with the skills and concepts.

 March 9: Complete CAHSEE bookelts (Check your answers--they are at the back of the book)  Use touches to take these tests on the following site:

http://www.testprepreview.com/cahsee_practice.htm

Commas Basic, Intermediate, and Advanced Grammar Reading for Main Ideas Advanced Reading Comprehension Sentence Correction and Sentence Correction 2 For each test, write the number of questions your answered correctly. For any test with more than 3 incorrect answers, follow the site links to practice modules for help with the skills and concepts.

Week 7:  March 12 - 16, 2012

CAHSEE bookelts

http://www.testprepreview.com/cahsee_practice.htm

March 12:  Review Expository Essays

Preview Persuasive Writing

Complete Tragedy: Another View handout and discussion

March 13: CAHSEE English Test

March 14: Introduction to Tone and Connotation  

Group work: Read and complete two tone worksheets in class

Imagery and Tone: Excercises A-J

Homework: Complete any exercises unfinished in class

 Complete Imagery and Tone Discussion Exercises B-E; Complete Imagery and Tone Apply questions B and D

March 15: Details and Tone: Exercises A-D

Homework: Complete any exercises unfinished in class Details and Tone: Apply A and B

March 16: Imagery and Tone Workshop

Follow the Poe link and complete an analysis of the Poe passage (This is an individual assignment and will test your analytical abilities!)

Week 8:  March 19 - 23, 2012

March 19:  Follow the Poe link and complete an analysis of the Poe passage (This is an individual assignment and will test your analytical abilities!)

March 20:  Introduction to syntax
Group work: Read 4 translations of Ode 1 and complete comparison/contrast worksheets. 

We will discuss your finding as a class.

Read through Antigone essay instructions and brainstorm/outline for the essay. Attach brainstorm to rough draft. Consult the Antigone online text if you need to search for concrete details.

March 21: Complete Antigone Ode worksheet

Literary Analysis: Antigone Ode 1

Homework: Complete your rough draft for homework

 March 22: Revise and edit Ode #1 essay.
Revision Steps:

1. Re-read the thesis statement: Do you identify two complimentary, yet different tones? Are the "tone " words exact? If not, review the list of tone words at Tone and Connotation.

2. Does each body paragraph focus on a single literary device? Do you take only the key examples from the ode rather than quoting entire sentences? (The images of "storm grey crests, " "tamed in the net of his mind," and "his blunt yoke has broken/The sultry shoulders of the mountain bull" all reinforce the ______ tone of the Ode.

3. Do you write at least 3 sentences of commentary to explain the connotation of diction or the affects of the images on tone? Go back into the quotations and address the specific meaning of specific words or literary devices and then explain how those words and devices reinforce, develop, or support tone.

4. Do you note moments in the Ode where the tone shifts, and do you offer an equal amount of evidence to support the existence of the two tones?

5. Do you discuss how the two tones are related, even though they are different? (Think about paradox and irony.)

6. Do you use smart words to describe the affects of literary devices on the theme?

7. Do you freight or telescope in the essay to vary sentence length?

Homework: Revise Antigone essay

March 23: Watch Caesar video and write down 15 facts on the real Caesar

Introduction to Shakespearian Language

Week 9:  March 26 - 30, 2012

 March 26: Watch Caesar video and write down 15 facts on the real Caesar

Introduction to Shakespearian Language

Homework: Complete your rough draft for homework

Antigone essay instructions.  

Antigone online text

Sample Antigone essay rough draft

March 27: Revise and edit Ode #1 essay.

Revision Steps:

1. Re-read the thesis statement: Do you identify two complimentary, yet different tones? Are the "tone " words exact? If not, review the list of tone words at Tone and Connotation

2. Does each body paragraph focus on a single literary device? Do you take only the key examples from the ode rather than quoting entire sentences? (The images of "storm grey crests, " "tamed in the net of his mind," and "his blunt yoke has broken/The sultry shoulders of the mountain bull" all reinforce the ______ tone of the Ode.

3. Do you write at least 3 sentences of commentary to explain the connotation of diction or the affects of the images on tone? Go back into the quotations and address the specific meaning of specific words or literary devices and then explain how those words and devices reinforce, develop, or support tone.

4. Do you note moments in the Ode where the tone shifts, and do you offer an equal amount of evidence to support the existence of the two tones?

5. Do you discuss how the two tones are related, even though they are different? (Think about paradox and irony.)

6. Do you use smart words to describe the affects of literary devices on the theme?

7. Do you freight or telescope in the essay to vary sentence length?

Homework: Revise Antigone essay

March 28: Introduction to Shakespeare

Word Inversion: Rewrite the sentence "I ate the sandwich" at least 5 different ways. You cannot change any of the words.

Omission: Discuss Omission schemes

Contractions: Discuss Shakespearean contractions

Homework: Revise Antigone essay

March 29: WE WILL USE THE TEXT OF SHAKESPEARE'S JULIUS CAESAR IN CLASS AND YOU WILL READ FROM A MODERN LANGUAGE SUMMARY OF THE PLAY AT HOME.

Read and discuss Scenes 1-2 from Act 1 of Caesar

Homework: Read the easy version of Julius Caesar Act 1

Antigone Essay Final draft due tomorrow

March 30: Antigone Essay Due

Complete Reading Act 1 from Caesar

Group work: 

1. Find 2 puns, 2 metaphors, 2 similes, 3 images, and complete 2 scansions of sentences to check for iambic pentameter in Act 1 scenes 1-2 of Caesar

2. Who speaks in poetry? Who speaks in prose? Who speaks in blank verse? why?

3. Identify at least 5 characteristics found in the characters of Caesar, Brutus, and Cassius.

Homework: Complete any unfinished work from the group work .

Week 10:  April 2-6, 2012

April 2: Career Unit

April 3: Complete Reading Act 1 from Caesar

Group work: 

1. Find 2 puns, 2 metaphors, 2 similes, 3 images, and complete 2 scansions of sentences to check for iambic pentameter in Act 1 scenes 1-2 of Caesar

2. Who speaks in poetry? Who speaks in prose? Who speaks in blank verse? why?

3. Identify at least 5 characteristics found in the characters of Caesar, Brutus, and Cassius.

Homework: Complete any unfinished work from the group work .

April 4: Complete discussion of Caesar Act 1.

Complete character analysis on Brutus, Caesar, Antony, Casca, and Cassius:

1. Create a list of adjectives that describes the character traits of each character listed above.

Homework: Study for an open note Act 1 quiz. You must have the notes in hard copy.  (The test is timed, so you should still study tonight so you will be able to finish it. You will not have time to look up every answer.)

Read the easy version of Julius Caesar Act 2

April 5: Caesar Quiz Act 1 (Grade in class) 

Read Julius Caesar Act 2: Discuss images, the tripartite man, and conflicts  

April 6: Close Reading Questions (pg 242, #6 a-d 6.)

"Our Course will seem to bloody , Caius Cassius" (Act II Scene 1, Line 162)

a. Brutus says, "Let's be sacrifices, but nor butchers, Caius." Collect together the expressions used by Brutus which are appropriate to butchery.

b. Brutus says that ideally they should be killing Caesar's spirit, not his body. Look up the words of Caesar's ghost in Act IV Scene 3, lines 281, 282, and 284, and comment on the irony.

c. Brutus turns harsh words and phrases into softer ones, to make a savage act seem like a civilized one. How does he choose his words to achieve this?

d. How is Brutus's dismissal of Antony consistent in expression with his earlier imagery?

In pairs of two, complete a Venn Diagram that compares and contrasts Brutus and Caesar, Portia and Calpurnia.

Underneath each comparison, write at least 4 sentences explaining the differences between the characters and speculate as to why Shakespeare portrays them in this manner.

Week 12:  April 16-20, 2012

April 16: Complete Julius Caesar Act 2: Discuss images, the tripartite man, and conflicts  

April 6: Close Reading Questions (pg 242, #6 a-d 6.)

"Our Course will seem to bloody , Caius Cassius" (Act II Scene 1, Line 162)

a. Brutus says, "Let's be sacrifices, but nor butchers, Caius." Collect together the expressions used by Brutus which are appropriate to butchery.

b. Brutus says that ideally they should be killing Caesar's spirit, not his body. Look up the words of Caesar's ghost in Act IV Scene 3, lines 281, 282, and 284, and comment on the irony.

c. Brutus turns harsh words and phrases into softer ones, to make a savage act seem like a civilized one. How does he choose his words to achieve this?

d. How is Brutus's dismissal of Antony consistent in expression with his earlier imagery?

In pairs of two, complete a Venn Diagram that compares and contrasts Brutus and Caesar, Portia and Calpurnia.

Underneath each comparison, write at least 4 sentences explaining the differences between the characters and speculate as to why Shakespeare portrays them in this manner.

April 17: Read JULIUS CAESAR Act III, scenes 1 and 2

April 18: Complete JULIUS CAESAR Act III, scenes 1 and 2
Complete Close Reading Questions
Julius Caesar: Close Reading Questions
8. “Romans, countrymen and lovers” (Act III Scene2, line13)

a. This is a speech based on reason (unlike Antony’s later, which is based on passion). Why does Brutus say the crowd should believe him?

b. How many words can you find that are antithetical (that is, in strong contrast), such as “less”/ “more”, “living”/ “dead”? What is the cumulative effect?

c. Many words and phrases are balanced: for example, “As Caesar loved me, I weep for him ; as he was fortunate, I rejoice at it; as he was valiant, I honour him”. Find more, and say why they are calculated to win over the crowd.

9. “Friends, Romans, Countrymen, lend me your ears” (Act III Scene 2, line 71)

a. Antony uses the word “honourable” to describe Brutus and Cassius eight times. Each time the way in which it is spoken is different, and with a different purpose. Carefully trace the transition from the first “For Brutus was an honourable man” to “They that have done this deed are honourable”, explaining how Antony’s oratory has led the crowd from one point of view to another.

b. In his second sentence, Antony says he is content to let Caesar’s good points be buried with his bones. How many good points does he in fact make before this 35-line speech is ended?

c. How does Antony deploy the words “ambition” and “ambitious” to win over the commoners to hid point of view?

Homework: Complete “Close Reading Questions” p. 243 #8, a,b,c and #9 a-c
Preview and read through Rhetorical Devices list

April 19:Minimum Day

Watch video of Brutus and Antony’s speeches.

Group work: Identify at least 5 rhetorical devices in the speeches of Brutus and Antony.  Explain how the lines of the speech you choose qualify as models for the rhetorical devices.

April 20: In groups of 3, complete the Julius Caesar Study Questions

p. 222, #15; p. 225, # 9; p. 229, #6; p. 238 #4 a-d, g,

15. On his arrival at the Senate, Caesar has 30 lines (Act III Scene 1, lines 35-48; 58-73) to speak before Casca strikes his first blow. Find examples in those lines of:


a. his vanity
b. his arrogance
c. his affectation
d. his pride

9. In his address to the mob in the forum (Act III Scene 2, lines 12-44), Brutus speaks in prose, not blank verse. His words have been described as “a lecture”.


a. Show from the speech that Brutus knows he enjoys the respect of Roman citizens.
b. Show that he believes the crowd is capable of making rational and just decisions.
c. Show that his speech is based on an appeal to reason and logic.
d. Show that he is proud of his patriotism and his republicanism.
e. Show that he wishes to act magnanimously. Comment on the wisdom of his approach and assumptions. Do you think it is reasonable to describe him as politically naïve?

6. In Act II Scene I, in which Cassius wins over Brutus to the conspiracy, show evidence of
a. his tact
b. his ability to strike the right note when making his approach.
c. His willingness to take a second place when it suits him.

4. Antony shows a masterly control over the fickle nature of the common people.
a. Before Antony ascends to the Public Chair to make his oration, which remark typifies the commoners’ dull-wittedness?
b. Whereas Brutus’s speech appealed to the intellect, Antony’s is emotional. He ends his opening remarks by choking back tears. How do the people react?
c. Marullus says of the commoners, “You blocks, you stones, you worse than senseless things” (Act I Scene I, line 36). Antony says, “You are not wood, you are not stones, but men” (Act III Scene I, line 140). Explain why Antony’s oratorical approach shows a greater understanding of crowd psychology.
d. Why does Antony mention the will to the crowd , but decline at first to read it?
g. The commoners forget the will till Antony reminds them of it (line 236). What does this tell us of their powers of concentration?

Week 13:  April 23-27, 2012

April 23: Complete and discuss Close Reading Questions
Julius Caesar: Close Reading Questions
8. “Romans, countrymen and lovers” (Act III Scene2, line13)
a. This is a speech based on reason (unlike Antony’s later, which is based on passion). Why does Brutus say the crowd should believe him?
b. How many words can you find that are antithetical (that is, in strong contrast), such as “less”/ “more”, “living”/ “dead”? What is the cumulative effect?
c. Many words and phrases are balanced: for example, “As Caesar loved me, I weep for him ; as he was fortunate, I rejoice at it; as he was valiant, I honour him”. Find more, and say why they are calculated to win over the crowd.
9. “Friends, Romans, Countrymen, lend me your ears” (Act III Scene 2, line 71)
a. Antony uses the word “honourable” to describe Brutus and Cassius eight times. Each time the way in which it is spoken is different, and with a different purpose. Carefully trace the transition from the first “For Brutus was an honourable man” to “They that have done this deed are honourable”, explaining how Antony’s oratory has led the crowd from one point of view to another.
b. In his second sentence, Antony says he is content to let Caesar’s good points be buried with his bones. How many good points does he in fact make before this 35-line speech is ended?
c. How does Antony deploy the words “ambition” and “ambitious” to win over the commoners to hid point of view?


 Rhetorical Devices list

April 24: In groups of 3, complete the Julius Caesar Study Questions
 p. 222, #15; p. 225, # 9; p. 229, #6; p. 238 #4 a-d, g,
15. On his arrival at the Senate, Caesar has 30 lines (Act III Scene 1, lines 35-48; 58-73) to speak before Casca strikes his first blow. Find examples in those lines of:
a. his vanity
b. his arrogance
c. his affectation
d. his pride
9. In his address to the mob in the forum (Act III Scene 2, lines 12-44), Brutus speaks in prose, not blank verse. His words have been described as “a lecture”.
a. Show from the speech that Brutus knows he enjoys the respect of Roman citizens.
b. Show that he believes the crowd is capable of making rational and just decisions.
c. Show that his speech is based on an appeal to reason and logic.
d. Show that he is proud of his patriotism and his republicanism.
e. Show that he wishes to act magnanimously. Comment on the wisdom of his approach and assumptions. Do you think it is reasonable to describe him as politically naïve?
6. In Act II Scene I, in which Cassius wins over Brutus to the conspiracy, show evidence of
a. his tact
b. his ability to strike the right note when making his approach.
c. His willingness to take a second place when it suits him.
4. Antony shows a masterly control over the fickle nature of the common people.
a. Before Antony ascends to the Public Chair to make his oration, which remark typifies the commoners’ dull-wittedness?
b. Whereas Brutus’s speech appealed to the intellect, Antony’s is emotional. He ends his opening remarks by choking back tears. How do the people react?
c. Marullus says of the commoners, “You blocks, you stones, you worse than senseless things” (Act I Scene I, line 36). Antony says, “You are not wood, you are not stones, but men” (Act III Scene I, line 140). Explain why Antony’s oratorical approach shows a greater understanding of crowd psychology.
d. Why does Antony mention the will to the crowd , but decline at first to read it?
g. The commoners forget the will till Antony reminds them of it (line 236). What does this tell us of their powers of concentration?

April 25: Quiz on Acts 2-3 (open note)
Begin Reading Act 4 of JULIUS CAESAR
Homework: Read modern language version of Julius Caesar, Act IV  
April 26: Complete Act IV of Julius Caesar

Complete Act 4 of JULIUS CAESAR in class: Focus on character and images of court world/green world.
 Discuss Act 4
April 27: Read Act 5 in class. 
During the readings, take notes on tragic elements in the play: hubris, anagnorisis, perepetia, hamartia, and catharsis.


Week 14:  April 30 - May 4, 2012

April 30: No Class

May 1: CST Testing

If time permits: begin the following in groups of 4:
17. In his argument with Cassius in Act IV scene 3, Brutus refers to Caesar in terms of both praise and criticism. Find the speech and decide whether

a. the praise is consistent with earlier references to Caesar’s qualities and

b. whether the criticism is so major that Brutus should have mentioned it earlier.

10. The quarrel scene (Act IV Scene 2) has been belittled by the critic Thomas Rymer in the seventeenth century; praised by John Dryden, his contemporary, for its “masculinity” in the eighteenth century; admired as an example of dramatic genius in the nineteenth century (by Samuel Taylor Coleridge); and dismissed as irrelevant by twentieth century critic Henry Bradley. Read it carefully and decide for yourself

a. Whether Brutus is (i) unrealistic in expecting his allies always to act honorably or (ii) admirable in his inflexible attitude toward corruption.

b. Whether Brutus is (i) arrogant and insensitive towards Cassius at the beginning of the quarrel or (ii) properly firm and uncompromising.

c. Whether Brutus is (i) taunts Cassius or (ii) refuses to be browbeaten by him (Explain your answer)

d. Whether Brutus is (i) insultingly cold or (ii) admirable forthright

e. Whether Brutus is (i) sober form …”hides wrongs” or (ii) whether he is “armed so strong in honesty” that he cannot compromise.

Form an opinion of your own about the character of Brutus as it is revealed in the quarrel with Cassius from its beginning to its height.

10. The quarrel scene (Act IV Scene 3) shows Cassius in many moods.

a. choleric: what are the reasons for his anger, and are they justified?

b. tormented: how does Brutus provoke him , and what does Cassius’s restraint reveal about his personality?

c. passionate: does the passion throw a new light on his character?

d. affectionate: how does this show and is it surprising?

e. jocular: which episode brings out a flash of humor, and what is its purpose?

f. sympathetically emotional: would you have expected him to react to Portia’s death in the way he does? How does it compare with Brutus’s own response?

g. dependent: what evidence is there to show that in his relationship with Brutus, there is another side to Cassius than the one presented before the assassination?

After finishing the questions, identify the following parts of Julius Caesar and post it on your web sites: (Provide an explanation of each stage and where it occurs in the play. If you have problems remembering the terms, go to the top of the page and follow the Greek Tragedy link for definitions.)

Hamartia

Periptiea

Anagnorisis

Catharsis 

May 2: No Class

May 3: CST Testing

See above to complete Julius Caesar questions

May 4: Late Start Day

Caesar Quiz Acts 4-5
Caesar Review and character analysis
   
                             Julius Caesar Project
In groups of 3-4, select an important scene from Julius Caesar. Rewrite the scene into contemporary language. The scene should reveal specific characteristics of the play's characters. As you read and rewrite the scene into modern language, you should use your dialogue and voice to emphasize those characteristics (i.e. Brutus should be noble, Cassius should be duplicitous, etc.) You may turn the scene into a Western, a soap opera, a Dr. Seuss rhyme, an episode from your favorite TV show, etc.
Divide key roles and use the ipods to create a dramatic reading of the scene. Search the web for sound fx, and include appropriate sound fx within your presentation.
After you complete the reading and recording, we will post the audio to a shared site.  You will write your own, one page analysis of why your group chose to reenact this scene and explain what Shakespeare reveals about the character you played in your presentation. In the commentary, you must move beyond the obvious plot situation, and analyze the key character's spiritual, psychological, social, etc. motivation. Discuss what new insights you have about the character's qualities after portraying him or her.
40 points

Week 15:  May 7 - 11, 2012


  May 8: Caesar Quiz Acts 4-5

Create a David Letterman style top 5 list for "Things overheard as Julius Caesar went to the Capitol on
the Ides of March."

Directions: Using appropriate humor, create a list of 5-7 statements that may have been overheard on Caesar’s final walk to the capitol in Rome. You may adapt lines from commercials, films, television shows, etc. in order to create you list. Turn your statements in at the end of the period. If yours is good enough, it will be added to the list. Work in groups of 2-3 people; use one piece of paper identify all group members.

1.“Cassius and Casca, and Brutus, oh my! 
                                                             Caesar 
2.“King of the Castle, King of the Castle!” 
                                                             Caesar 
3.“The price is wrong, Caesar!” 
                                                             Casca 
4. “Don’t run with knives, boys!!!” 
                                                             Portia
5.“I’m a sole man!!” 
                                                            Cobbler 
6.“Got milk?” 
                                                            Portia 
7. Dagger-$50
    Clean Toga-$75
    Killing your best friend--Priceless
                                                            Brutus 
8.“It doesn’t matter, kissing her is like kissing an ashtray.” 
                                                            Brutus 
9.“All men are idiots, and I married their king!” 
                                                           Calpurnia 
10.“Mmmm, Toasty!!!!” 
                                                           Portia
May 10: Caesar Final test

Introduction to Caomparison and Contrast Essays

                             Julius Caesar Project
In groups of 3-4, select an important scene from Julius Caesar. Rewrite the scene into contemporary language. The scene should reveal specific characteristics of the play's characters. As you read and rewrite the scene into modern language, you should use your dialogue and voice to emphasize those characteristics (i.e. Brutus should be noble, Cassius should be duplicitous, etc.) You may turn the scene into a Western, a soap opera, a Dr. Seuss rhyme, an episode from your favorite TV show, etc.
Divide key roles and use the ipods to create a dramatic reading of the scene. Search the web for sound fx, and include appropriate sound fx within your presentation.
After you complete the reading and recording, we will post the audio to a shared site.  You will write your own, one page analysis of why your group chose to reenact this scene and explain what Shakespeare reveals about the character you played in your presentation. In the commentary, you must move beyond the obvious plot situation, and analyze the key character's spiritual, psychological, social, etc. motivation. Discuss what new insights you have about the character's qualities after portraying him or her.
40 points

May 11: Begin The Caine Mutiny
Students will watch The Caine Mutiny and prepare for a comparison and contrast character analysis between one character from Julius Caesar and one character from The Caine Muntiny.

Take notes on the following in the movie:

Character's actions

Character's words

What other people say about the character

The characters to look for are:

Humphrey Bogart: Lt. Cmdr. Philip Francis Queeg--Caesar

Van Johnson: Lt. Steve Maryk--Brutus

Fred MacMurray: Lt. Tom Keefer--Cassius

Robert Francis: Ens. Willis 'Willie' Seward Keith--no matching character from Caesar but the center of the action in the movie.

Week 16:  May 14 - 18, 2012


 May 15:  The Caine Mutiny
Students will watch The Caine Mutiny and prepare for a comparison and contrast character analysis between one character from Julius Caesar and one character from The Caine Muntiny.

Take notes on the following in the movie:

Character's actions

Character's words

What other people say about the character

The characters to look for are:

Humphrey Bogart: Lt. Cmdr. Philip Francis Queeg--Caesar

Van Johnson: Lt. Steve Maryk--Brutus

Fred MacMurray: Lt. Tom Keefer--Cassius

Robert Francis: Ens. Willis 'Willie' Seward Keith--no matching character from Caesar but the center of the action in the movie.

May 17: Complete The Caine Mutiny

Take notes on character in preparation for Comparison and Contrast essay 

Brainstorm for essay

Sample Student Drafts

Homework: Use prompt to brainstorm for the Caesar/Caine Mutiny  comparison and contrast essay

May 18: In-Class Essay

Week 17:  May 21 - 25, 2012


 May 21:  Introduction to Poetry

Reading good and bad poetry: discuss images, concrete details and sentimentality in poetry.

Group Work: In pairs, read 11 samples of bad poetic lines and state what is wrong with them. 

Read McKuen and Stafford poems and compare/contrast in order to evaluate which is better.

May 22: Caesar/Caine Mutiny Peer Response and Revision

Homework: Revise and type your comparison and contrast essay

May 23: Late Start Day

Introduction to lyric poetry and images: “To Satch”

Samuel Allen    "To Satch"    

Sometimes I feel like I will never stop    

Just go on forever    

Till one fine morning    

I'll reach up and grab me a handful of stars    

And swing out my long lean leg    

And whip three hot strikes burning down the heavens  

 And look over at God and say    

How about that!

Fill in the Poetry Notes Worksheet as we study each type of poetry. Fill in the blanks during lecture.

In Prentice Hall  Literature: Read  Lorca, "The Guitar.” Complete questions 3 and 7 on page 606

Homework: Revise Essay for Friday's Submission

May 24: Introduction to Narrative poetry:

Read the hypertext I have created to analyze Frost's, “The Tuft of Flowers.”

Group Work: In pairs of 2, read Poe’s “Eldorado.” 

 “Eldorado” on-line,  or page 198 in Appreciating Literature

a. Identify how the poem meets the criteria of a narrative poem.   

b. Identify elements of plot in the poem. (setting, conflict, exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution. Include a sentence or two of commentary  that will define the plot element listed above and offer a summary of what is happening in the poem at that moment. 

2. Explain the allusion to "mountains of the moon," "Valley of the Shadow," and the shadow.

3. Explain what  Eldorado might symbolize.

4. Analyze 6-9 specific examples of diction at the beginning, middle and end of the poem and explain the connotation of the words.

Homework: Caesar/Caine Mutiny Essay due tomorrow

May 25: Minimum Day

Casear/Caine Essay Due

Review "Eldorado" analysis

Week 18:  May 28 - June 1, 2012


 May 28: Mermorial Day

May 29: Introduction to Dramatic Poetry and connotation: “My Last Duchess
Group Work: Read Plath’s “The Mirror” (page 158 in Appreciating Literature)

1. Identify how this poem meets the criteria of a dramatic poem. State who the speaker is. Refer to the notes you receive in class.

2. Identify 5 images in the poem: State whether they are visual, auditory, gustatory, olfactory, or tactile. Comment on how the images reinforce the mood of the poem

3. What is the allusion in "Now I am a lake. A woman bends over me."?

May 30: Introduction to the English Sonnet: Shakespeare, “Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer’s Day?”
Group Work: Read Johnson's "My City" (page 631 in Prentice Hall Literature). In groups of 3, complete questions 4 and 7 on page 634.

May 31: Introduction to the Petrarchan Sonnet. View this page to find the notes and the poem "Puritan Sonnet"

Answering the following questions.

1. Identify the rhyme scheme of the poem

2. Complete a scansion on 3 lines of the poem. (Identify line length and meter--like the example from "Shall I Compare thee to a Summer's Day). 

3. Identify at least 5 images in the poem (Try to find images that appeal to different senses)

4. Identify the problem (situation) and solution in the sonnet

5. Define the words austere, immaculate, and sheaves

6. Identify four sound devices in the poem (assonance, alliteration, consonance)

7. What is the speaker's attitude toward the New England winter landscape?

8. What view of life does the poem present?

Homework: Study notes for Poetry Quiz #1

June 1:  Poetry Test #1 (Types, Imagery, Sound devices, Allusion, Repetition)

After correcting the test, you will receive an introduction to diction and tone

Read "My Papa's Waltz" and the notes on tone. Complete the tone excercise.

Week 19:  June 4 - June 8, 2012

June 4: Complete discussion of "Puritan Sonnet"

Answering the following questions.

1. Identify the rhyme scheme of the poem

2. Complete a scansion on 3 lines of the poem. (Identify line length and meter--like the example from "Shall I Compare thee to a Summer's Day). 

3. Identify at least 5 images in the poem (Try to find images that appeal to different senses)

4. Identify the problem (situation) and solution in the sonnet

5. Define the words austere, immaculate, and sheaves

6. Identify four sound devices in the poem (assonance, alliteration, consonance)

7. What is the speaker's attitude toward the New England winter landscape?

8. What view of life does the poem present?

 Read "My Papa's Waltz" and the notes on tone. Complete the tone excercise.

June 5: Read and discuss "July Storm;" diction, imagery, alliteration, simile, personification, rhyme and tone

June 6: Introduction to metaphors (simile, personification, metonymy, and synecdoche) Analyze Lawrence Ferlinghetti's   "Constantly Risking Absurdity" which focuses on a poet's attempts to capture truth and beauty in verse.

Answer the following questions in groups of 3:
1. To what sort of performer is the poet compared?

2. Name at least 3 feats of the poet/performer.

3. What picture of the poet does Ferlinghetti create by calling him a "little charleychaplin man?" Contrast this image with that of beauty in lines 25-26. What does this contrast suggest about the relationship between a poet and art?

4. Define realist. Since super means both "above" and to "a greater degree, what two ideas about poetry does Ferlinghetti suggest when he says that the poet is a "super realist."

5. Find three example of Ferlinghetti's inventiveness with language (puns, compound words, etc.) and describe the effects of each.

6. What is the tone of the poem? Explain.

Homework: Study for Poetry Quiz #2: metaphors and tone

 June 7:  Poetry quiz #2

Introduction to Theme

June 8: Introduction to theme: Read William Blake's "London" and analyze, diction, imagery, sound devices, rhyme, and tone, develop how to arrive at theme.

  1. Review TP CASTT notes on how to find a theme in a   poem.

2. Copy and paste the "London" onto your laptop; you will create a hypertext on the poem by answering the questions below.

3. Analyze three examples of diction, three pieces of imagery, and the rhyme to identify the tone of the poem.

4. Based on the evidence in #3, state the tone of the poem.

5. Using the TP CASTT, how to find theme link as a model, identify the theme in the poem.

Week 20:  June 11 - June 14, 2012

June 11: Complete theme in William Blake's "London" and analyze, diction, imagery, sound devices, rhyme, and tone, develop how to arrive at theme.

  1. Review TP CASTT notes on how to find a theme in a   poem.

3. Analyze three examples of diction, three pieces of imagery, and the rhyme to identify the tone of the poem.

4. Based on the evidence in #3, state the tone of the poem.

5. Using the TP CASTT, how to find theme link as a model, identify the theme in the poem.

Final Exam Review   

Matching terms:

Personification       metaphor         euphony       cacophony 

 Visual image        olfactory image          auditory image 

 gustatory image     Tactile image    connotation      diction 

allusion             Alliteration         simile        onomatopoeia  

 Poems and authors:

“To Satch,” Samuel Allen            “Eldorado” E.A. Poe 

 “The Tuft of Flowers,” Frost      “Sonnet 18,” Shakespeare

"The Mirror" Plath                      "My Papa's Waltz" Roethke 

"Puritan Sonnet" Wylie

Application: Review old quizzes to identify poetic devices in sample lines of poetry.  

Final Essay:  

All athletes must face a time in life when applause, attention, and status disappears from their lives.  In both of the poems below, athletic ability has disappeared; in one case, it is taken by death, in the other case, it is taken by age or negligence. 

Compare and contrast the use of metaphors, images, and tone in Houseman’s  “To an Athlete Dying Young” and Updike’s "Ex-Basketball Player.”  What is each speaker’s attitude toward their subject?  How does each speaker feel about the manner in which the athletes end their days of glory?  

“To an Athlete Dying Young” vocabulary

Laurel—a laurel or ivy wreath; placed on the head of a champion as a crown of glory.

Lintel—a horizontal beam over a doorway

betimes—quickly

renown—fame

garland—refers to the laurel wreath  

Each essay must include an introduction that states the themes of both poems and a thesis statement.  Body paragraphs must contain at least 2-3 quotes; each quote should be followed by three sentences of commentary that explains how the literary devices in the quote create the tone of the poem.  You will need to read and analyze both poems, and you should spend about 20 minutes brainstorming in order to develop a thesis and supporting ideas for your essay.  

June 12: Final Exam